The Unity of God with Us

The Unity of God with Us

  • Today in Saint Elizabeth Ann Seton
  • The Most Holy Trinity
  • 16 June 2019

The belief that God is a community of Persons is central to Christianity. Despite the many divisions among various Churches, the dogma of the Trinity is held in common by all Christians. Since we were created in God’s image, human beings are essentially a community as well. The problems and difficulties that arise between peoples and nations are typically the result of our failure to live as the community we were created to be. Jesus comes among us, as the presence of God in the world, in order to recall us to the unity that lies at the core of our being. He establishes His Church to be the visible image of community that continues to manifest God’s presence in the world. This is why the Christian is baptized into the community of believers and cannot be an authentic Christian individually. We must regularly gather together in communion with one another, and this enables us to be receptive to the Spirit that is given to the Church.

The three consecutive feasts that conclude the Easter season give us a glimpse of the foundational nature of the Church as the community of believers. First there is the feast of Pentecost, which is the coming of the Holy Spirit upon the Church. Because of God’s Holy Spirit, in union with the Father and the Son, and now poured out upon the Church, we have all become the adopted children of God and share in the one Sonshipof Jesus Christ. Trinity Sunday follows, where the one God is revealed and experienced as a community of persons. And next Sunday we have the feast of Corpus Christi, where the Body of Christ is identified as the sacrament of God’s presence in the world in the context of the gathered community we call the Church. The essential reality of the Holy Spirit living in the Church, the one God who is a community of persons, and the community of believers being the living presence of Christ in the world, is why the Church is so fond of using familial language. The Church is the family of God, and as such, we use terms like father, mother, sister and brother to describe the relationships we have with one another. If the family is divided or fractured, all the members are damaged. If the family is united and living in peace, all the members are enriched.

On this Trinity Sunday, and on this Father’s Day, we pray for our family the Church and for our own family. We pray for the unity and peace we were meant to enjoy from the time before we were born. If the certainty of our faith can help us to remain in communion with the Church, and the hope we share for the Kingdom can allow us to pray with the family of God, then perhaps the love we have for each other can re- pair the fractures in our own families and bring us the peace we seek from God our Father and our Lord Jesus Christ.